United Arab Emirates makes world’s fastest, longest ranged, highest flying business jet

10 06 2010

Emivest Aerospace, owned by Emivest from the UAE, produces the world’s fastest, longest ranged, highest flying business jets.

Take a look at photographs of these wonderful jet planes Emivest produces.

World's fastest business jet has a range of 2,500 nm

Take a closer look at Emivest Aerospace’s own gallery for better pictures and more information.

Specifications of world’s fastest, longest-ranged, highest-flying business jet!

Performance
High Speed Cruise
Mach 0.83
MPH 560
KTAS 486
Km/H 901
Long Range Cruise 2,875 sm (2500 nm)
Mach 0.76
MPH 502
KTAS 436
Km/H 807
Stall Speed 91 KCAS
FAA Take-Off Balanced Field Length GW 3,939 ft (1200 m)
FAA Landing Distance 2,941 ft (896 m)
Seating Seven Place w/Pilot
Engines (2) FJ44-2A Williams Rolls
Take-Off Thrust 4,600 lbs total (2,300 lbs ea)
Design Data
Pressurization 12.0 psi
Max. Certified Altitude 49,000 ft
Cabin Altitude is Sea Level Up To 41,000 ft
Mmo Above 29,500 ft Mach 0.83
Vmo Up To 29,500 ft 320 KCAS (593 km/h)
Vref 105 KCAS
Speed Brake Operation No Speed Limit
Weights
Max. Ramp Wt. 14,050 lbs (6373 kgs)
Max. Take-Off Wt. 13,950 lbs (6327 kgs)
Max. Landing Wt. 12,725 lbs (5772 kgs)
Max. Zero Fuel Wt. 10,500 lbs (4763 kgs)
Basic Operating Wt. 8,650 lbs (3923 kgs)
Max. Fuel Quantity 4,850 lbs (2199 kgs)
Max. Baggage Compartment Wt. 500 lbs (227 kgs)
Aircraft Characteristics
Overall Length 46.80 ft (14.26 m)
Overall Height 14.19 ft (4.33 m)
Wing: Span 42.33 ft (12.90 m)
Sweep (@ 1/4 Chord) 30.1°
Dihedral 2.3°
Area 190.69 sq ft (17.71 sq m)
Aspect Ratio 9.40
Mean Aerodynamic Chord (MAC) 5.12 ft (1.56 m)
Horizontal Tail: Span 14.56 ft (4.44 m)
Sweep (@ 1/4 Chord) 33°
Dihedral
Area 36.72 sq ft (3.41 sq m)
Aspect Ratio 5.77
Mean Aerodynamic Chord (MAC) 2.72 ft (0.83 m)
Vertical Tail: Span 7.21 ft (2.20 m)
Sweep (@ 1/4 Chord) 55.5°
Dihedral 46.80 sq ft (4.35 sq m)
Area 11.56 sq ft (1.07 sq m)
Aspect Ratio 1.11
Mean Aerodynamic Chord (MAC) 7.10 ft (2.17 m)
Ventral Fin: Total Area 11.56 sq ft (1.07 sq m)
Ventral Rudder Area 1.95 sq ft (0.18 sq m)
Landing Gear: Width Between Main Gear 6.85 ft (2.09 m)
Wheelbase 18.84 ft (5.74 m)
Tire Size 16 in x 4.4 in

The above information has been taken from here.





Top 500 Largest African Companies/ Business Firms/ Entreprises 2008

6 06 2010

Not only does the reputed publication JeuneAfrique compile an annual ranking of the 500 largest African companies (and its 200 largest Banks/ Financial Institutions), the online English-language version theafricareport.com provides the list of top 500 African firms for interested readers to glance over.

South African dominance continues

Traditionally, South Africa has led the surging African domestic economy. There was no exception in 2008 either. More than 200 companies from South Africa in the list of top 500 African firms shows the dominance of Africa’s industrial and economic leader. Out of the top 10 companies in 2008, seven were South African. It must be added that omission of Libyan and Nigerian oil companies allow South Africa to retain its “stranglehold” on the top 10. Maybe Sudanese companies could have entered the list if their reports were analyzed by JeuneAfrique/theAfricareport.com.

North Africa chips away at South Africa’s lead

Unmistakably, North African and Subsaharan African countries (excluding the leader South Africa) are chipping away at the huge lead enjoyed by South Africa. Libya’s secrecy also fails to unmask a number of huge firms from a booming “frontier” market with grand plans of over 500 billion Dinars in investments by 2020.

Lest one forgets, rapidly growing Sudan is another attractive destination for savvy investors. Sudan eyes becoming the owner and operator of the top 3 military-industrial complexes in all of Africa, behind Egypt and South Africa.

Its unmistakable surge forward can be witnessed in the completion of the remarkable Merowe Dam - Africa’s largest. Intended to become the hub of trade in East Africa, Mogran District deserves a mention. The likes of Giad Motors and Safat Aviation Complex have propelled Sudan to new heights. It is one of the first African countries to operate aviation MRO entreprises of its own and to manufacture or assemble helicopters and aeroplanes. That becomes all the more praiseworthy considering it has been sanctioned by western countries for far too long to be ignored.

Noticably no Sudanese companies apart from telecom firms made the list. Maybe lack of transparency is the cause. Also, the author admits to excluding Zimbabwe from the list for some inexplicable reason.

Some caution regarding “double-counting” is in order. Subsidiaries of parent entreprises are also included in the list just like foreign entreprises. The only factor taken into account is the annual turnover measured using market exchange rates and expressed in US$.

Top 500 African business entreprises based on annual revenues 2008





Top 100 Largest Private Companies or Groups in Indonesia ranked by annual revenues

21 05 2010

Top 100 Private Groups by GlobeAsia magazine

GlobeAsia magazine publishes its annual rankings of wealthiest individuals in Indonesia, best universities, and even the largest private groups. As already mentioned, State Owned Entreprises (SOEs) are not included in the list.

The figures for annual revenues are probably rounded to the nearest $ ‘00,000,000 (US$10 million) for the first 27 grouops. This list was published in June 2009, presumably the figures correspond to the latest financial year. Foreign owned entreprises operating in Indonesia have also being included if their sales figures in Indonesia for the year earned them a place in the top 100 Private Groups list.


100 Largest Private Groups of Companies from Indonesia by GlobeAsia published in June 2009

Vital role of State owned Entreprises

Oil company Pertamina still remains Indonesia’s single largest entreprise measured by annual sales figures. Other large state-owned entreprises such as PT Perusahaan Listrik Negara (PLN), PT Bank Rakyat Tbk, PT Telekomunikasi Indonesia Tbk, PT Bank Negara Indonesia among others play a vital role and would be included in any ranking of the largest Indonesian companies if the only criterion were its annual revenues.  PT PAL, PT Dirgantara, PT Bumi Resources Tbk. and many other notable entreprises involved in strategically important industries are also state-owned.

As in most other South East Asian (ASEAN) countries with significant ethnic Chinese populations, Indonesia too has  a disproportionately high share of ethnic Chinese amongst the list of its wealthiest tycoons. It is little wonder that this GlobeAsia Top 100 Private Businesses List is also dominated at the top by ethnic-Chinese owned entreprises.

The same feature can be seen in Thailand, Malaysia, Philippines and ASEAN in general.

Scope for progress remains

The world’s 4th most populous country is involved a wide variety of industries and economic sectors including pharmaceuticals, automotive industry, shipbuilding, aerospace, textiles, garments, chemicals, mining, metallurgy, banking, finance (incl. banking and finance in accordance with the Sharia’h) which is an encouraging sign.

The volume of activity one may expect from such a populous, strategically located, naturally resourceful country which has shown healthy economic progress in the last few years is not reflected in this list.

Considering that most “strategically important” industries are dominated by the government and the private sector by the minority ethnic-Chinese population to a large extent, there is scope for more progress for the world’s 3rd largest democracy.





100 largest Iranian companies or business entreprises for 2008-09

20 05 2010

Latest results are out: 200 largest companies from the Islamic Republic of Iran shows some fascinating changes, newcomers and change in sales revenues.

IMI (Industrial Management Institute) of Iran has been publishing its annual ranking of the largest Iranian companies for over a decade now. Sales revenue is the sole criterion for this ranking.

Managerial and entrepreneurial expertise

IMI believes the ranking will reflect on the adeptness of the overall managerial and entrepreneurial section of society. As such, monopolies are believed to exhibit a “weak” relationship between management expertise and annual sales income.

National Iranian Oil Company (NIOC), National Iranian Gas Company (NIGC), state-run Telecommunications Company and other similar entreprises are usually excluded for this reason.

Breaking the trend, Esfahan Oil Refinery Company enters the list this time around.

Iranian calendar begins on March 21st and ends on March 20th. The ranking for 1387th year corresponds to a calendar starting on March 21st, 2008 and ending on March 20th, 2009 in Gregorian calendar.

Hilarious Translations

The complete list with many hilarious translations can be seen below.

Due credit is given to IMI and the researchers involved with this difficult task.

Due to my poor hold of the Farsi language, I had to resort to online translators which produced some of the hilarious translations you can find below.

Overall, these are interesting figures to pore over.

Certainly, Islamic Republic of Iran has a wide variety of entreprises engaged in various economic sectors, although one may wonder if more software, home appliance manufacturer, biotechnology firms would be seen in future lists considering the strong position of Iran in those sectors.

The list is taken from IMI website. If any knowledgable Farsi speaker would like to correct and/or improve any of the listings, kindly drop a line or post a comment with your opinion.

Only the first 100 entreprises have been listed below.  Click on the image below repeatedly until you see the enlarged and clearer image.

A poor translation of the list produced by IMI

Any comments, suggestions or ideas are welcome as long as they remain civilized.

The companies highlighted in red need to have their names sorted out. Would any knowledgable Farsi speaker tackle the issue?

Omissions

Some notable omissions are Electricity Supply and Power Generation companies, Bonyads, IDRO (don’t confuse it with IMIDRO which is another entreprise), alongside the “monopolies” mentioned at IMI’s website (like NIOC, NIGC, TCI although its affiliate MCI is included). Also it could be possible that computer hardware manufacturers, home appliance makers (which makes refrigerators, washing machines, microwave ovens and other appliances), biotechnology companies, Defence Industries Organization – a company that was present on earlier versions of the ranking probably missed out this time due to lack of timely submission of annual sales revenue figures, mobile telephone manufacturers, government owned defence and research entreprises may possibly be missing from the list due to timely submission of annual sales revenue figures.

Encouraging Prospects

This list is very enlightening, it is hoped that knowledgable Farsi speakers would correct some of the mistakes in these lists. The extent of diversification and sophistication shown by these lists shows encouraging signs for the future of Iranian scientific and industrial community, Inshallah, all other Muslim countries will follow suit.

In future editions, other countries’ top 100 companies, top 500 companies or ranking of largest companies will hopefully be published.





Largest Iranian companies or business entreprises for 2008-09

19 05 2010

Latest results are out: 200 largest companies from the Islamic Republic of Iran shows some fascinating changes, newcomers and change in sales revenues.

IMI (Industrial Management Institute) of Iran has been publishing its annual ranking of the largest Iranian companies for over a decade now. Sales revenue is the sole criterion for this ranking.

IMI believes the ranking will reflect on the adeptness of the overall managerial and entrepreneurial section of society. As such, monopolies are believed to exhibit a “weak” relationship between management expertise and annual sales income.

National Iranian Oil Company (NIOC), National Iranian Gas Company (NIGC), state-run Telecommunications Company and other similar entreprises are usually excluded for this reason.

Breaking the trend, Esfahan Oil Refinery Company enters the list this time around.

Iranian calendar begins on March 21st and ends on March 20th. The ranking for 1387th year corresponds to a calendar starting on March 21st, 2008 and ending on March 20th, 2009 in Gregorian calendar.

The complete list with many hilarious translations can be seen below.

Due credit is given to IMI and the researchers involved with this difficult task.

Due to my poor hold of the Farsi language, I had to resort to online translators which produced some of the hilarious translations you can find below.

Overall, these are interesting figures to pore over.

Certainly, Islamic Republic of Iran has a wide variety of entreprises engaged in various economic sectors, although one may wonder if more software, home appliance manufacturer, biotechnology firms would be seen in future lists considering the strong position of Iran in those sectors.

The list is taken from IMI website. If any knowledgable Farsi speaker would like to correct and/or improve any of the listings, kindly drop a line or post a comment with your opinion.

Only the first 100 entreprises have been listed below.

A poor translation of the list produced by IMI

Click on the image to see full-scale picture. Any comments, suggestions or ideas are welcome as long as they remain civilized.

The companies highlighted in red need to have their names sorted out. Would any knowledgable Farsi speaker tackle the issue?





An English cricketer chooses Dubai over England

14 02 2010

Andrew Flintoff’s Dubai

Andrew Flintoff and his family have set up home in Dubai. Here, he offers a guide to the city and reveals why it’s the ideal location for a cricketer.

By Andrew Flintoff
Published: 8:00AM GMT 14 Feb 2010

My wife Rachael and I have been on holiday to Dubai with our children (Holly, five, Corey, four, and now Rocky, one) many times. We’d always enjoyed it and about a year ago we got chatting about the possibility of living here. So after my knee operation in September we just decided to do it – the children only start school once and we thought we should get ourselves settled.

Dubai was right for me professionally as well. I’m coming back from another operation a month ago and with all the rehab I’m doing and the medical facilities here – as well as the cricket facilities for me to practise – it was a no-brainer. It’ll probably be the end of July or early August before I’m back on a cricket field again for Lancashire.

So now we’re living here. We started off in the Marina, the world’s largest man-made marina, up by the Palm. We loved it, but it was a bit of a trek to the childrens’ schools, 30 minutes or more inland. So we moved to Festival City, which is reasonably close.

I knew a few people here before the move but when you have children your social life is pretty much about them. So our gang of mates are mostly parents at the schools. We’ve been lucky with that because in the classroom there’ll be six or seven nationalities and many of them know nothing about cricket. So I’ve turned into an “Andrew” again. Either that or “Corey’s dad”, but never Freddie.

You can do pretty much anything you want in Dubai. In terms of getting around, everywhere’s within half an hour in the car. We take the kids to the beach all the time and they’re free; always running around, having swimming lessons, mucking about.

Our favourite is Jumeirah Beach, a huge stretch of sand with lots of cafés and all sorts of things to do. We’re members of the beach club at the Jumeirah Beach Hotel, and that takes in the Madinat and the Burj Al Arab, the hotel that looks like a big sail in the ocean. Dubai is superb for watersports and I plan to get a kayak and do some kayaking. But I have to be careful what I do; I can’t really waterski, for example. I would try monoskiing, but the problem is my dodgy knee’s on my right side and my bad ankle’s on my left, so I can’t really use either.

And there’s skiing, here, too, on a vast indoor ski slope at Ski Dubai in the Mall of the Emirates. I’m not allowed to ski, for obvious reasons, but it’s a great place and the kids love it.

As for eating out, again, Dubai has pretty much everything and the restaurants are spot on. There’s a group of them at the Madinat, but for its setting, Pierchic at the Al Qasr is hard to beat – you walk a hundred yards or so to the end of a pier and eat superb fish surrounded by the sea.

Our favourite place, though, is Zuma, a Japanese restaurant by the Emirates Towers. There’s one in London and the chef from there, Colin Clague, has moved here, so he’s handy for getting us a table. There are a couple of good American steakhouses, Ruth’s Chris and JW’s, at The Marriott. And for a special treat for my birthday this year, Rachael and I had dinner in the desert. That was something I’d really recommend. We eat out at least once a week but Dubai wakes early. The children start school at a quarter to eight and we’re mindful of getting them to bed on time. I’m up that little bit earlier than I used to be, too. I’m not really a morning person so these days I need a few early nights.

All of which means we don’t get out to bars much but there are dozens of great places. The hotels and sports clubs are where most people tend to go and everything’s themed – you’ve got the Irish Village, Aussie Legends, a Cricketer’s, a Jockey’s… I’ve got to say that there’s not much of Lancashire, where I’m from, represented out here. I think I’m the only Lancastrian in town. I’m thinking of starting up my own themed bar – and calling it the Red Rose Camp!

I’ve been back to England three times since we’ve been here and of course we miss friends and family. But it’s not as if we’re worlds away. Dubai is only a seven-hour flight from Britain and there is plenty to remind us of home – including a Waitrose in the Dubai Mall, the big shopping centre. My parents have been out twice – I took my mother to the Mall, and she was amazed by it.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/celebritytravel/7221016/Andrew-Flintoffs-Dubai.html





Iran Asserts Space Ambition Amid US Moon Problem

7 02 2010
Iran Asserts Space Ambition Amid US Moon Problem
Sun, 07 Feb 2010 16:36:03 GMT
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By Sam K. Parks-Kia

The United States may have the muscle power to drive a wedge between the West and Iran, but when it comes to aerospace technology Tehran’s future looks brighter.

Having already taken the lead in the Middle East as the first country to acquire space-related technology, Iran set yet another a record in the region and become the first state to send living organisms into outer space on February 3, 2010.

The successful launch of the Explorer (Kavoshgar) III satellite carrier opened a new chapter in the region’s aerospace space field.

The Explorer (Kavoshgar) III, equipped an experimental capsule, transfers telemetric data, live pictures and flight and environmental analysis data. Live video transmission and the mini-environmental lab enable Iranian scientists to study the biological capsule — which carries a rat, two turtles and worms.

On top of that, Tehran inaugurated a satellite image processing center and a 3-D Laboratory, which can simulate satellites movements in real time.

In February 2008, Iran launched the Explorer (Kavoshgar) I into space. The Explorer (Kavoshgar) II, which carried a space-lab and a restoration system, was launched in November the same year. The Explorer (Kavoshgar) III is an updated version of the previous models.

Following the successful launch of the Explorer (Kavoshgar) III, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said, ” We have two more steps to take before we reach the point of no return — the point which [if we manage to reach] we have to declare that all of space can be conquered by Iranian scientists.”

“God willing our scientists would be personally present in the outer space to observe the skies from there,” Ahmadinejad said.

In February 2009, Iran’s Minister of Communications and Information Technology Reza Taqipour, who was head of the Iranian Aerospace Organization at the time, announced that Tehran was working on sending astronauts into space.

“China and India managed to send astronauts to space in programs which took approximately 15 years. We see ourselves taking the same path, but we hope to reach that goal in a shorter period,” he added.

According to Taqipour, the Iranian Aerospace Organization had drawn up a comprehensive plan to carry out a successful manned space mission by 2021.

Now, while Iran is pushing barriers and making achievements in the space industry, US President Barack Obama’s 2011 NASA budget request will effectively terminate the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s manned space flight program.

NASA was planning to send astronauts to the moon by 2020. However, the proposed budget would terminate the Constellation Program, which would have replaced the retiring Space Shuttles with a new crew vehicle, as well as building the new launchers required to send astronauts to the moon and Mars.

This would leave space leadership to China and Russia to be joined by Iran, should the country manage to achieve its stated goals.

Upon the lunch of the Explorer (Kavoshgar) III, the Iranian Minister of Communications and Information Technology asserted that the country “entered the space arena with steadfast will, and the foreseeable future we will become one of the premiers in the space industry.”

The Islamic Republic has already taken steps to bring aerospace technology to its universities by offering relevant courses and supplying faculties with required equipment.

Students of the Science and Industry University have already designed and manufactured an experimental communications satellite dubbed Ya Mahdi.

Students of Amir Kabir University of Technology have also designed and developed a satellite called AUT SAT, in cooperation with the Iranian Aerospace Organization.

The Iranian Aerospace Organization is now in close cooperation with seven universities in the country.

Bringing the space technology to domestic universities has laid the groundwork for the Islamic Republic to venture upon manufacturing most of the parts used in its space rockets and satellites inside Iran.

Such a move, according to the Iranian president, has “rendered sanctions imposed on the country by the West useless.” Ahmadinejad also believes that domesticating the production of part would “increase the reliability” of the final product.

“There are few countries in the universe capable of addressing the needs of all of their space-related technologies. However, thanks to the sanctions imposed on the Islamic Republic, Iran has reached self-sufficiency in this regard,” President Ahmadinejad said on February 3.








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